An Ideal Garment…

Such a hot summer many of us are having -even here in Newfoundland !

Have you thought about what clothing types would be best for such extreme temperatures ?

I thought that the best fabric would be cotton, since it is a cool, breathable fabric.

Then, of course, it should be organic cotton, made from plants grown without toxic pesticides or fertilizers. Most cotton currently grown worldwide is ‘bt’ genetically modified cotton which is produced with lots of toxic chemicals. It is considered to be harmful to the environment.

Also, the ideal garment should be white, since white clothing reflects light. This also would save on textile dyes, which are also harmful to the environment.

In my case, the best garment would be a dress. I don’t wear slacks unless I’m exercising. This is because when I was a girl, we weren’t allowed to wear slacks, and so I never really got used to them.

And the ideal dress would be modest, and loose fitting, for comfort in the heat.

It should also be produced in an ethical factory where workers are paid well.

And, the ideal garment should also decompose naturally, after it has provided the wearer with years of pleasure and comfort.

I can report to you that, after a long time of researching and sleuthing on the internet, I found one dress that fit all of the above criteria !

There is only one problem for me – the price of the dress is $770 US dollars. ( this is about my monthly food budget).

I am still searching for a similar garment, at a lower cost.

May God remind us to pray for cotton farmers who grow a precious crop.

Let us also remember to pray for those who have sewn the clothing that we wear.

Photo from TOVE internet site.

33 thoughts on “An Ideal Garment…

  1. Love the dress. We have a gathering called “Alafia” in January here, everything worn and used as it was in colonial days here. And they sell natural cotton fabric. It can be hand sewn with cotton or wool homespun thread (also for sale) and made into that exact dress much cheaper than $770. But that is quite an investment of time. Can be done and I may just do it next time I can buy some. Sounds fun and comfortable. Love the thought you have.πŸ˜€β€

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Wow – the Alafia gathering sounds so interesting, Tonya.
      I’ve also thought about buying natural cotton fabric and sewing my own clothes.
      Thanks for sharing. βš˜πŸ€—

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      1. Oh, you would love it. So cool. Everyone walks atound in their colonial clothing. Some is wool (a good choice for warm or cold- I guess it keeps things a consistent temperature, like an insulator?) and some is cotton. I will blog about it and take pictures next time we go.πŸ˜€β€

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That sounds so interesting, Tonya. I also wear natural cashmere wool when it gets cold here. I like to do research to see how fabric is produced, and who makes our clothing. And I pray that more scrutiny is placed on clothing factories who don’t have ethical labour standards. πŸ€—

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  2. A very thought provoking post Sally, even though I am not in the market for dresses😎
    We Christians do need to be responsible consumers though, and do our best to buy with care of our planet and of those who produce our purchases.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Pretty! I have had a lot of white cotton dresses over the years as a summertime staple. I liked to buy white cotton, because if I got tired of it, I could dye it any color I wanted and keep wearing it. πŸ˜‰πŸ‘At least that was the idea. Can’t remember a time I actually did it. 😏

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  4. My great-grandparents and grand parents were cotton farmers in Southwest Oklahoma (southern midwest US). My grandmother used to tell us she had three cotton dresses (sewed by her mother) and two pair of shoes for most of her childhood. (Not the same dresses and shoes, of courseπŸ™‚). $770 would have bought a good used tractor, back in the day.

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      1. I sure hope you find it! I love stretchy dresses, that almost feel like a t-shirt. Some of the skirts I’ve bought are what they call buttercream soft spandex. (I think that’s what they call it πŸ˜†)

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi ! Yes, white garments are mentioned in scripture. I think the organic cotton makes the item so expensive. I’m still searching for a similar item, at a more reasonable price. Thanks for your comment. πŸ€—βš˜

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I’ve been living in the heat for more than three decades, I started wearing Jam’s World in the summer 35 years ago. They are natural cotton and died in bright to pastel colors. I haven’t been able to find them lately, the shop in my town went out of business. I went to the company’s website and was shocked that the price for the “vintage” dresses I used to wear was up to $400. I found two on Etsy for around $50. Then the last day I was in Palm Springs, I found two more affordably priced in a small boutique.

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  6. I would wear a dress like that. Anything loose if what I look for, and I love white clothes. Yep, I would have to keep wearing my usual clothes since I too could not afford the price for the purity you are talking about.

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  7. we share a sense of style. I love the dress and yes I never wore slacks too growing up my dad is a no joke bishop and till now, I feel out of place when I wear them to an occasion but I never felt out of place working out in them. What’s the catch?

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    1. You are blessed to have a godly family ! Slacks are more practical for exercising, but other than that, dresses, I think, express our femininity. God created men and women to be equal, yet different. I love the dress in your profile picture ! πŸ€—

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